Glastonbury WiFi: Orgone is the Cure PDF Print E-mail
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Written by Jeff Wagg   

JREFer TheTurtleMoves informs us that some citizens in Glastonbury, England are complaining that the new experimental city-wide WiFi network is causing dizziness, nausea, and lack of creativity. I have to agree with the last part... there's certainly nothing "creative" about claiming that a relatively new technology is full of doom and gloom.

So what to do? Combat it with orgone of course. This Telegraph UK article has most of the story, but not all of it. (As a side – I wonder what protests went on when the telegraph was introduced.)

The article is full of woo-woo quotes from the protestors.

 

I thought Glastonbury was a rural town. I don't want my son exposed to risk 24 hours a day, including at his primary school which is within the wi-fi zone. I would be failing in my duty as a parent if I did.

I don't want my sons exposed to "risk" either, but if you're trying to protect them from WiFi signal, you've got an awfully big job ahead of you. First, establish that there IS risk.

Matt Todd, who campaigns against EMFs, said that residents had complained that chakras and ley lines are being disrupted. "They believe positive energy flows are being disturbed," he said.

Mr Todd has started building small generators which he believes can neutralise the allegedly-harmful radiation using the principles of orgone science. The pyramid-like machines use quartz crystals, selenite (a clear form of the mineral gypsum), semi-precious lapis lazuli stones, gold leaf and copper coil to absorb and recycle the supposedly-negative energy.

Chakras, again, have no evidence... if you can tell they're being disturbed, you can prove they exist. Ley lines... same thing. And look at all the pretty things this machine is made of! But consider what's being claimed... they generate orgone to "neutralise" the radiation. What does that mean? Imagine light, which is a form of radiation, being "neutralized" by something. Would that something be a device that sent out waves of dark?

Here's what the article is missing:

  • According to Wilhelm Reich, orgone is generated through orgasm, for which it's named.
  • If orgone can combat the evils of WiFi, it would be expected for orgone to prevent wireless communication at that frequency. Did your WiFi lose connection? See if the neighbors have their bedroom door locked.
  • If an individual complains of these negative effects from the WiFi network, they should be able to detect the presence of WiFi. All they'd need to do to test this would be to have someone randomly turn on the WiFi of their laptop and ask the person to detect when it was on.

  • WiFi operates at 2.4Ghz, the same frequency used by many cordless phones, some remote control devices, car alarms, and microwave ovens.
  • We are constantly bathed in EM from a multitude of sources, not least of which is the sun. Oh wait.. that's natural, so it can't possibly harm us. (Nor can arsenic, snake venom, or botulism, as they're natural too.)

  • "What about the children?" is a common pseudo-argument made by people who don't have the proper evidence to back up their claims.

This is just a guess here, but as the actual towers are mentioned in the article, I suspect this protest started as "gee, those towers are ugly" and then moved on to "isn't EM dangerous?" and progressed to "we have to protect the children!"

Given that any apartment building in the industrialized world has at least a dozen WiFi networks going at any one time, don't you think we should think about those children too?